Tag Archives: Higher Education

Topic 0021: High-Impact Educational Practices

High-Impact Educational Practices

A Brief Overview

Excerpt from High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, by George D. Kuh (AAC&U, 2008)

Chart of High-Impact Practices (pdf)

Source Taken from: https://www.aacu.org/leap/hips

High-Impact Educational Practices: A Brief Overview

The following teaching and learning practices have been widely tested and have been shown to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds. These practices take many different forms, depending on learner characteristics and on institutional priorities and contexts.

On many campuses, assessment of student involvement in active learning practices such as these has made it possible to assess the practices’ contribution to students’ cumulative learning. However, on almost all campuses, utilization of active learning practices is unsystematic, to the detriment of student learning. Presented below are brief descriptions of high-impact practices that educational research suggests increase rates of student retention and student engagement. The rest of this publication will explore in more detail why these types of practices are effective, which students have access to them, and, finally, what effect they might have on different cohorts of students.

First-Year Seminars and Experiences
Many schools now build into the curriculum first-year seminars or other programs that bring small groups of students together with faculty or staff on a regular basis. The highest-quality first-year experiences place a strong emphasis on critical inquiry, frequent writing, information literacy, collaborative learning, and other skills that develop students’ intellectual and practical competencies. First-year seminars can also involve students with cutting-edge questions in scholarship and with faculty members’ own research.

Common Intellectual Experiences
The older idea of a “core” curriculum has evolved into a variety of modern forms, such as a set of required common courses or a vertically organized general education program that includes advanced integrative studies and/or required participation in a learning community. These programs often combine broad themes—e.g., technology and society, global interdependence—with a variety of curricular and cocurricular options for students.

Learning Communities
The key goals for learning communities are to encourage integration of learning across courses and to involve students with “big questions” that matter beyond the classroom. Students take two or more linked courses as a group and work closely with one another and with their professors. Many learning communities explore a common topic and/or common readings through the lenses of different disciplines. Some deliberately link “liberal arts” and “professional courses”; others feature service learning.

Writing-Intensive Courses
These courses emphasize writing at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum, including final-year projects. Students are encouraged to produce and revise various forms of writing for different audiences in different disciplines. The effectiveness of this repeated practice “across the curriculum” has led to parallel efforts in such areas as quantitative reasoning, oral communication, information literacy, and, on some campuses, ethical inquiry.

Collaborative Assignments and Projects
Collaborative learning combines two key goals: learning to work and solve problems in the company of others, and sharpening one’s own understanding by listening seriously to the insights of others, especially those with different backgrounds and life experiences. Approaches range from study groups within a course, to team-based assignments and writing, to cooperative projects and research.

Undergraduate Research
Many colleges and universities are now providing research experiences for students in all disciplines. Undergraduate research, however, has been most prominently used in science disciplines. With strong support from the National Science Foundation and the research community, scientists are reshaping their courses to connect key concepts and questions with students’ early and active involvement in systematic investigation and research. The goal is to involve students with actively contested questions, empirical observation, cutting-edge technologies, and the sense of excitement that comes from working to answer important questions.

Diversity/Global Learning
Many colleges and universities now emphasize courses and programs that help students explore cultures, life experiences, and worldviews different from their own. These studies—which may address U.S. diversity, world cultures, or both—often explore “difficult differences” such as racial, ethnic, and gender inequality, or continuing struggles around the globe for human rights, freedom, and power. Frequently, intercultural studies are augmented by experiential learning in the community and/or by study abroad.

Service Learning, Community-Based Learning
In these programs, field-based “experiential learning” with community partners is an instructional strategy—and often a required part of the course. The idea is to give students direct experience with issues they are studying in the curriculum and with ongoing efforts to analyze and solve problems in the community. A key element in these programs is the opportunity students have to both apply what they are learning in real-world settings and reflect in a classroom setting on their service experiences. These programs model the idea that giving something back to the community is an important college outcome, and that working with community partners is good preparation for citizenship, work, and life.

Internships
Internships are another increasingly common form of experiential learning. The idea is to provide students with direct experience in a work setting—usually related to their career interests—and to give them the benefit of supervision and coaching from professionals in the field. If the internship is taken for course credit, students complete a project or paper that is approved by a faculty member.

Capstone Courses and Projects
Whether they’re called “senior capstones” or some other name, these culminating experiences require students nearing the end of their college years to create a project of some sort that integrates and applies what they’ve learned. The project might be a research paper, a performance, a portfolio of “best work,” or an exhibit of artwork. Capstones are offered both in departmental programs and, increasingly, in general education as well.

Assessment and Rubric

Assessment of student mastery of content takes many forms. This pages includes support materials for assessments and rubrics for many different assessment products. Those a selected assessments and rubrics that related to art and design. These will expose us with some idea on how designing a good assessment and rubric to enhance the learning outcome.

  1. Content-Analysis-Evaluation-Form-2006
  2. Element of Design Rubric
  3. Design Project Assessment Rubric
  4. Multimedia Project Rubric
  5. Multimedia Project Rubric
  6. Basic Video Rubric
  7. Video Project Rubric
  8. Storyboard Rubric
  9. Reflective Essay
  10. Reflective Essay
  11. Research Paper Rubric
  12. Visual Art Rubrics
  13. Online Discussion and Protocol Rubric
  14. Online Discussion and Development Rubric
  15. Case Study Guideline and Rubric
  16. Evidence-based Writing Rubric
  17. Research Paper Reflection
  18. E-Portfolio Rubric
  19. Teaching Portfolio
  20. Presentation Rubric

Rubric Template

  1. Rubric Template 01
  2. Rubric Template 02

Source taken from: http://www.schrockguide.net/assessment-and-rubrics.html

DESIGNING AN E-PORTFOLIO AS A STORAGE, WORKSPACE & SHOWCASE FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES CONTEXT

Abstract

The present articles introduce the e-Portfolio as a storage, workspace and showcase to support teaching and learning in higher education institutions (HEIs). Thus, the mix-method approach was implemented on determining important elements of e-Portfolio as a storage, workspace and showcase for a social sciences and humanities context. This study implemented thematic analysis and Fuzzy Delphi Method to obtain the result. Therefore, 25 experts in instructional technology was participated in the process of the making a decision. As resulted, this study highlighted the fundamental of e-Portfolio consists; workspace, storage and showcase. Eventually, the instructional designer will understand and strategies on how to develop an effective e-Portfolio as learning support tool to enhance the learning experience between facilitator and learner.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/301515025_Designing_an_E-Portfolio_as_a_Storage_Workspace_and_Showcase_for_Social_Sciences_and_Humanities_in_Higher_Education_Institutions_HEIs

PUBLICATION: Are Students Ready to Adopt E-Portfolio? Social Science and Humanities Context

This paper presents the learners readiness towards the implementation of E-Portfolio as means of solving the persistent problems in educational setting. The purpose of the study was to examine the learner’s readiness towards the implementation E-Portfolio in higher education. Initially, this paper was conducted a study with a total number of 300 students form Social Sciences and Humanites cluster and then practicing portfolio in their coursework. The pilot study was conducted and showed the reliability coefficient with Cronbach’s alpha () is 0.825. The instrument was divided into five components which involved (1) technology accessibility (2) online skills and relationship (3) motivation (4) internet discussion and (5) importance to success, to measure the learners’ readiness. The findings were reported that students are ready to have an E-Portfolio as a learning tool in constructing their knowledge and experience of learning. The E-Portfolio will extend the opportunity from paper-based into the electronic based with a variety of online learning features in gaining students interest and motivation in learning. At the end of the day, the E-Portfolio will not only benefit the students and the faculty but also towards the employability.
Are Students Ready to Adopt E-Portfolio? Social Science and Humanities Context. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277325158_Are_Students_Ready_to_Adopt_E-Portfolio_Social_Science_and_Humanities_Context [accessed Jun 15, 2015].

E-learning and Disability in Higher Education

Most people working within the higher education sector understand the importance of making e-learning accessible to students with disabilities, yet it is not always clear exactly how this should be accomplished.  E-Learning and Disability in Higher Education evaluates current accessibility practice and critiques the extent to which ‘best’ practices can be confidently identified and disseminated. This second edition has been fully updated and includes a focus on research that seeks to give ‘voice’ to disabled students in a way that provides an indispensible insight into their relationship with technologies and the institutions in which they study. Examining the social, educational, and political background behind making online learning accessible in higher and further education, E-Learning and Disability in Higher Education considers the roles and perspectives of the key stake-holders involved in e-learning: lecturers, professors, instructional designers, learning technologists, student support services, staff developers, and senior managers and administrators.

Source: books.google.com.au

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