Five technology in education trends for 2018

education-trends-2018

It’s the final month of the calendar year but the world of education is already comprehensively planning for 2018. As SMT objectives evolve and technology advances, new teaching methods and edtech trends emerge each year. Technology in education constantly disrupts and enhances pedagogy. It paves the way for new learning experiences and provides innovative ways to achieve core goals for the next academic year.

Here’s the trends in technology and education to look out for in 2018:

1. Cloud-based technology

In 2018, cloud computing will continue to make learning a more streamlined experience for pupils. Students will no longer worry about files and documents being lost or deleted, or buying multiple USB flash drives to save their assignments. Essays, content related to projects, schedules and assignments will be shared more easily and securely stored on the cloud, such as Google Docs. With more centralised storage for resources, cloud-based technology will allow educators to increase their reach and share information without increased expenditure, or additional time pressure.

2. Virtual and augmented reality

SMT will provide teachers with tools for delivering enhanced learning experiences through augmented and virtual reality in 2018. After the success of Pokemon Go, we witnessed the emergence of augmented reality in educationin 2017. Teachers are increasingly using AR to layer virtual content on printed materials to enhance understanding and inspiration. The_State_of_Technology_in_Education_ReportWith the release of increasingly affordable and accessible VR accessories, we can expect more from this technology in 2018. The number of free apps and teaching platforms designed specifically for virtual education is growing. VR and AR will move from experimental to ubiquitous in learning. Work with your IT team to review the available devices, and make sure you investigate the costs of emulating a real work environment effectively.

3. STEAM — arts and STEM

There has been a strong pedagogical focus to increase the digital literacy of pupils, and encourage more students to adopt tech-focused subjects over the past few years. This has ensured children grow into more responsible netizens, as well as fostering key transferable skills for their futures.

According to our research on the use of technology in education in 2017, STEM classes are perceived as the most technologically-advanced of the curriculum. More traditional arts and humanities subjects, however, are recognised as catching up in their use of edtech.

Trends in technology, and the increased use of edtech across the entire curriculum, indicates that creativity will return to the forefront of education. Incorporating elements of creativity into STEM subjects has undeniable benefits including increasing the accessibility across genders, and engaging different types of learners. The STEAM approach will take more shape in 2018.

4. Technology to prevent bullying

With the prolific nature of mobile devices and social platforms, it’s a sad truth that online bullying is becoming increasingly common. While technology is an enabler for abusive behaviour, it will go on to provide more robust solutions to the problem in 2018.

Edtech will be used extensively in 2018 to monitor pupils’ technology, track the use of search terms that they use, as well as all visited websites. More apps will allow teachers and SMTs to remotely view any of their students’ devices. Other technologies will be applied directly to pupils’ devices to monitor tone of voice, location services, image scanning, keyword flagging and social media activity, to give an overall picture of a child’s mood.

Platforms to provide a means of reporting and communication between teachers and pupils will grow in popularity. These tools raise awareness of the widespread bullying issue, and enhance methods of communication.

5. Mobile-style education

Today, many pupils own a mobile device. Tapping this technology for learning in 2018 will improve engagement and motivation across all learning abilities. Mobile learning will also offer greater flexibility and accessibility for learning at home. Connecting mobile technology and devices within the classroom will allow teachers to provide a fully immersive, integrated learning experience for all learning styles and abilities.

Thank to pupils’ intuitive use of technology, in 2018 more schools will adopt tablet-like experiences for their front of class displays and incorporate this with camouflaged learning techniques and the gamification of learning. Traditional interactive whiteboards are becoming harder to scale or costly to replace, whereas SMTs are turning to more future-proof, upgradeable technologies like Promethean ActivPanels.

Innovations and trends in technology across businesses and enterprise are giving SMTs more advanced tools and better forms of edtech to improve their school’s results and enhance their teachers’ pedagogy. Innovative teachers, meanwhile, are getting more creative with their edtech, finding ways to use technology for differentiated learning and increased engagement.

The biggest potential impact on pupils of technology in education in 2018 will be the opportunity to nurture skills to help them succeed, increase the quality of learning across mixed-ability classes, and protect students’ online safety.

 

Source taken from: https://resourced.prometheanworld.com/edtech-trends-2018/

FULL REPORT: The_State_of_Technology_in_Education_Report

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2018 MANDATE : Embracing Industry 4.0

Themed “Higher Education 4.0: Knowledge, Industry and Humanity”, the 2018 mandate from Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh is centred on embracing the Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0) as part of the call to revamp the Malaysian higher education system.

While last year’s mandate unveiled the ministry’s plan on redesigning higher education, this year witnessed on initiatives to ensure all higher education institutions will be relevant and remain competitive in the dawning of Industry 4.0.

And Idris stressed to realise this, first, the process of teaching and learning has to be changed. Under Learning and Teaching 4.0, there are four aspects which should be put into paramount.

First, the learning spaces should be redesigned. (eg : lecturer halls with multi-tiered collaborative tables and the use of smart board)

Second, different kinds of pedagodies are needed, which are heutagogy (self-determined learning), paragogy (peer-oriented learning) and cybergogy (virtual-based learning).

Third, curriculum had to be fluid and organic. Idris announced that as of 2018, up to 30 per cent of all university programmes will adopt this concept, enabling them to respond to innovations and new areas of knowledge without being bound by traditional rigid curriculum practices.

And fourth, all of the aforementioned should incorporate the latest learning and teaching technologies.

Idris also urged for lessons to integrate ‘learning without lectures’ concept, of which classes need not be conducted through lectures.

Another concept, called ‘evaluation without examinations’, highlights on how assessments need not be based solely on exams.

There should be lesser worries on unemployment issues as Idris said there would be new types of jobs created under the TVET 4.0 framework. The framework will look at new industries and how to prepare students for the changes brought by Industry 4.0.

Another move is to address the challenges of Industry 4.0, which is to have the industry and the academia act as one to fulfil industry and graduate needs. This could be continued with exisiting initiatives introduced by the ministry, such as 2u2i and CEO@Faculty programs.

And last but not least, based on all the elements presented in the mandate, Idris explained on how the idea of merging academia and industry to benefit humanity in the long run. The human element, he said, must go along with the technical tools brought about by Industry 4.0.

http://news.mohe.gov.my/2018/01/27/2018-mandate-embracing-industry-4-0/

The 8 Digital Skills Students Need for The Future ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

In a recent research article published by PEW Internet under the title ” The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is Taught in Schools “, 91% of teachers surveyed report that ” judging the quality of information ” as the top of the digital skills students need for the future. Similarly, another 91 report that “writing effectively” as being essential skill for students while 54 % of teachers think that working with audio, video or graphic content as being important but not essential.GjEmzgcBl-fnJq-X-vnHQTl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVvK0kTmF0xjctABnaLJIm9.jpg

How To Design A 21st Century Assessment

Contemporary curriculum design involves multiple facets: engaging 21st Century skills, using digital tools, collaborating with others around the globe, performance tasks, and more. Getting these design elements into a teacher’s current curriculum demands that teachers create professional habits around Replacement Thinking.

Four considerations for Replacement Thinking around assessments. In a nutshell, those considerations include:

  1. Students must demonstrate what they’ve learned. Whatever they create with digital tools should still represent what students were to learn. The assessment shouldn’t tell you more about their use of a tool than it does about the student’s work using the tool.
  2. Students should demonstrate content proficiency and sophistication. Their new product should reflect the content knowledge that they’ve learned and the multiple cognitive zones they participated in during the learning process.
  3. Students should be frequently reflecting on their choices. Students should be able to articulate and defend their tool choices, content inclusion, and degrees of audience interaction and how those choices affected the resulting product.
  4. Students must give credit where credit is due. They should know about copyright, Creative Commons licensing, and how to search for and use appropriate content, giving attribution for the media resources they use.

And while assessments are the focus of this blog post, replacement thinking can be applied across the curriculum: in instructional strategies, classroom activities, or in formative data collection using tools such as Kahoot, Socrative, or Google Forms. To help you start thinking about Replacement Thinking, I’d like to offer the following action steps to bring more contemporary ideas into your own professional practices:

  • Action Step 1: Stop thinking technology first.
  • Action Step 2: Give students authentic choice in how they will demonstrate their learning.
  • Action Step 3: Help students seek feedback from other students, other educators, and experts in the field.
  • Action Step 4: Provide always-on, asynchronous access to that which is being assessed.

Problem and Issues: What does 21st century learning and assessment look like?

How about Objective and Assessment: (Do technology-based options enhance or detract from student understanding of content? Data from student surveys will be evaluated to determine student engagement in project. Data from student surveys will determine student disposition at three stages of the process.)

21st-century-assessment-fi.jpg

  1. 21st Classroom Assessment
  2. 21st Century Skills_Assessment
  3. Guideline 21st Assessment
  4. Characteristic 21st Century Assessment

21st Century Teaching and Learning

Source taken from: John Sole, Founder and CEO of Guerrilla Educators

With one prominent exception, 21st century teaching and learning best practices are largely the same even if the century numbers are inverted. Sound, effective educational best practices in the 21st century share certain strategic, timeless characteristics. To that end, we have identified ten experience based Hallmarks of 21st Century Teaching and Learning that can be used as touchstones in the educator’s pedagogical approach to teaching and learning.

The overarching caveat, of course, is that technology in the 21st century has permeated most aspects of education and culture and has changed everything. How we, as educators, use technology with our students is now the key to unlocking those 21st century global skillsets so that our students can lead and compete in a world where geography has become, in many ways, superfluous.

The Hallmarks:

  • Project Based Learning
  • Student Ownership/Engagement
  • Collaborative Teaching/Cooperative Learning
  • Citizenship/Leadership/Personal Responsibility
  • Community Partnerships
  • Mastery of Curriculum/Development of Higher Order Thinking Skills
  • Technology/21st Century Skills
  • The Teachable Moment
  • Reporting Out/Celebration
  • Fun

1. Project Based Learning

Project Based Learning is the primary gateway through which the Hallmarks are realized. There are consistent characteristics that make a Project viable. Some of these are that Projects should be:

  • Hands-On
  • Collaborative
  • Multi-Disciplinary
  • Student Centered
  • Real-Time
  • Real-World
  • Flexible

Just as any discussion about the design of 21st century teaching/learning spaces includes, by nature, flexibility of those spaces, so too the design of 21st century teaching and learning must also be flexible. With technology an integral aspect of our lives, more than ever our students have individual learning styles that must be taken into account. PBL provides a plethora of opportunities for students and teachers to be engaged in ways that are best suited to their optimum learning styles.

This short video demonstrates a real world boat building Project featuring middle grade students at a Philadelphia charter school that authentically models these characteristics: https://youtu.be/lyNNC0Pa3zk.

2. Ownership and Engagement

When students are interested and invested in the completion of a school-based project, they begin to own their educational processes. With ownership, all aspects of their school career, including mastery of curriculum become important to them. With ownership also comes:

  • Personal responsibility
  • Strategies like critical thinking and generating hypotheses and extension of learning becomes commonplace
  • Motivation to succeed

Ownership starts with you, the teacher! Get invested in the processes of PBL. Initiate projects with your students that interest you, so you can authentically model ownership.

Ownership and engagement are essentially 2 sides of the same coin. When students take ownership and personal responsibility for the successful outcome of their Project, it follows that they are engaged and interested. Any good Service Learning project will present students with many opportunities to think critically, make hypotheses, and extend what they have learned. Engagement is the door to performing these important skills, which in turn, engenders academic and civic success.

This high school Project activity using the built environment is a great example of student engagement: https://youtu.be/Mu5vODUKTeg.

3. Collaborative Teaching and Cooperative Learning

Teacher collaborations present powerful opportunities for educators to learn from each other, which can increase the strategies available to them in their pedagogical toolboxes. With technology, it is now just as possible to collaborate virtually with the teacher across the globe as it is across the hall.

Students working cooperatively in small groups to achieve project-based goals is a powerful strategy to achieve curricular and standards based objectives. Moreover, when students are focused on the goals of a project, they are more inclined to negotiate with their peers which clarifies their understandings and solidifies their learning. The cooperative nature of small groups working together for successful completion of the project also has an extremely positive effect on the classroom climate and behavior issues are significantly mitigated.

This Project with post graduate students demonstrates experientially collaboration and cooperation: https://youtu.be/mr04qE46fXg.

4. Citizenship, Leadership, and Personal Responsibility

Development of good citizenship skills as part of the fabric of teaching and learning is critical to the long term, real-life success of our students.

Civic skills give greater depth, context and meaning to student mastery of curriculum and standards. Integral to a Project is the inclusion of Community Partnerships. Professionals who freely give their time and expertise to benefit students are models of good citizenship.

Project Based Learning requires administrative and teacher leadership while developing those qualities in our students. One of the key components of effective leadership is having the humility to know what you don’t know and having the ability to listen and learn, from those who do. So, for teachers and administrators:

  • Leadership involves having the inner strength to make decisions and to take personal responsibility for the consequences of those decisions
  • Leadership is enabling those whom you lead to be innovative problem solvers without feeling threatened by their success
  • Leadership is being able to buffer and protect those you lead from distractions and impediments so they may carry out their responsibilities unimpeded by those distractions
  • Leadership is the ability to turn mistakes into “teachable moments” rather than “blamable moments”
  • Leadership is knowing when to step back to give opportunities for those in your charge to take the lead, while understanding that ultimate responsibility rests with you
  • Leaders understand that leadership is a way of life and therefore unbound by the time constraints of the school or business day/week

It is incumbent upon us as educators to instill in our students that, as much as the teachers have a responsibility to present information in interesting, informative, and innovative ways, students also have the personal responsibility to make sure that they have mastered the requisite information to satisfy the goals and objectives of the Project. Student engagement, ownership, and interest in the successful completion of the Project engenders personal responsibility. Ultimately, one of our most critical functions as educators is to inculcate this sense of personal responsibility in our students.

5: Community Partnerships

Community Partners are the heart of Project Based and 21st century teaching and learning. Having real-world professionals and others in the community work with our students to help address real-world problems present powerful opportunities for students to get involved and engaged as citizens and leaders while achieving and retaining, curricular and standards-based proficiencies. Community Partners also model good citizenship/leadership and provide opportunities for taking class trips that are fun and demonstrate real-world learning skills.

This video demonstrates how Community Partnerships both in, and out of, classrooms can have a transformational effect on students: https://youtu.be/PPrfbiVZmxo.

6. Mastery of Curriculum and Higher Order Thinking Skills

The primary rationale to employ Project Based Learning is, in fact, as a tool for student achievement, both academically and socially. A project’s success is ultimately determined by whether the project-based activities are connected to grade appropriate curriculum and state standards and more importantly, whether these connections enable students to achieve mastery across a range of academic disciplines. We have seen that when students work within the Project Based methodology they own their educational processes, are engaged in a project’s activities, work cooperatively to achieve success, and see citizenship modeled by the Community Partners, then mastery of curriculum becomes more likely.

This video shows second graders making and testing hypotheses: https://youtu.be/b133AGFclCY.

Universal access to the internet by our students has changed the equation of how they learn, whether we, as educators, are ready for this change or not. Unlike the traditional teaching and learning experience, with the Project Based methodology students are gaining knowledge experientially. Rather than feeding the students disconnected facts to be regurgitated on a test, Project Teachers coach the students to apply that knowledge to real world situations which engenders Higher Order Thinking Skills like evaluation, synthesis, and analysis. Many of the videos on the Guerilla Educators blog authentically demonstrate HOTS in Action.

7. Technology and 21st Century Skills

Technology is the #2 pencil of the 21st century. As such, any good Service Learning project will be embedded with a wide array of real-world technology-based applications. We still, by and large, teach interminably about how to use tech applications with our students. Well, that ship has sailed given the fact that the younger we are, the greater our ability to use technology in an agile way. So now, more than ever we need an educational paradigm shift away from learning how to use technology and towards using it.

This high school Project activity using the built environment is a great example of students using technology: https://youtu.be/Mu5vODUKTeg.

8. The Teachable Moment

Agile educators nimbly take advantage of those “off the curriculum grid” spontaneous learning opportunities when they occur. These teachable moments are powerful opportunities for effective, authentic teaching and learning to take place. Being able to identify and use real-time teachable moments is one of those transcendent qualities that good educators possess. Click here to see two examples of teachable moments in real-time.

9. Reporting and Celebration

Students will report out to peers, school staff, and the larger community:

  • What they learned
  • How they addressed the problems or issues
  • Their final products. …and
  • They will be celebrated for their important, authentic, real-time work

10. Fun

As a 4th grader concisely put it some years ago, “Teacher John, if it ain’t fun, why would we do it?” School and Fun? While the terms are usually perceived to be in diametric opposition to each other, students having FUN within the framework of their school-based activities is an integral aspect of Effective Teaching and Learning and is one of the overarching links that facilitate academic and civic success.

This short video is a compilation from 2 elementary schools conducting on-site water monitoring and having FUN: https://youtu.be/4VaI_LWu8mY.

art I edutech I photography I scientist

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