Category Archives: WEB 2.0 For Education

The Relationship between Blended and Flipped Learning

Flipped Learning is a SUBSET.

The relationship between both (Blended and Flipped Learning); 1) set learning objective, 2) teaching approaches and 3) collaboration and reflection 4) integration of technology in teaching.

More explanation about Blended and Flipped Learning

Sources:

1. https://elearningindustry.com/blended-learning-vs-flipped-learning-can-tell-difference

2. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10639-017-9636-8

3. http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/teaching-format/blended-learning-and-the-flipped-classroom

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Benefit of Using Portfolios in Education: Tools and Resources for Teachers and Students

Digital portfolios are great teaching, learning, and assessment tools. In today’s post we are focusing on the learning part and are looking at e-portfolios from a student-centric perspective. To learn how teachers can leverage the powerful of portfolios in their instruction, check out Arter and Spandel (1992) paper (see reference list at the bottom of this page). By definition, a portfolio, according to Arter and Spandel, ‘is a purposeful collection of student work that exhibits to the student, or others, her efforts or achievement in one or more areas’ (cited in  Baki and Birgin, 2007, p. 77). The key word here is ‘purposeful’, a portfolio is different from a folder in that it has a purpose and is guided by a number of learning objectives and expected outcomes. Without intentional planning, a portfolio becomes a mere receptacle of one’s work.

 

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Three processes are involved in portfolio creation: collection, selection, and reflection. Each of these processes trains students in a number of skills. Together they provide students with the appropriate mindset to help them take responsibility of their learning and thrive as budding life-long learners.

There are numerous benefits students will gain from incorporating portfolios in their learning. Here is a summarized list of some these benefits based on readings we did in this regard (see sources list at the bottom of this post).
Portfolios enable students to record their learning and document their growth over a period of time.

  • They Provide students with a venue through which they can showcase their learning.
    They can be used as a tool for self-assessment, self-reflection and personal development.
  • They help students focus on the process of learning rather than the end product.
  • They promote deeper learning as students actively engage in the learning process.
  • They develop students metacognitive skills (reflective practices) and help them take control of their learning.
  • They empower students’ voice.
  • They are a ‘methodof self-discovery and confidence building’.
  • They help students develop personal and academic identities.
  • They assist students in locating their strengths and weaknesses and plan for future improvement.
  • They invite teachers’ feedback and peers’s input.
  • They help students develop their writing skills.
  • A portfolio presents a concrete evidence of your work and achievements to prospective employers.
  • There are several web tools students can use to create digital portfolios. We have already reviewed a number of them over the last few years. But if you are to ask us about the ones we recommend the most, we would direct you to the following:

We have created an infographic version of this post. Check out here.

  1. Google Sites: This is one of the best platforms we have been recommending for teachers over the last few years. Students can use it to create and host their own digital portfolios. The site is simple and easy to use and they can set up their new website within minutes. They can create as many pages as they want, then upload their content, and share with others. Site Help has everything students need to effectively use Google Sites.
  2. Weebly: This is another good website  students can use to create digital portfolios. Like Google Sites, Weebly provides users with a simple drag and drop editor that allows you to design your website the way you want. No HTML or coding knowledge acquired. You simply select a template, customize it with your own content and publish it to the web.
  3. Google Slides: Google Slides can be used to create digital portolios in the form of a presentation. There is actually a pre-made template for that. This Portfolio template provides students with a tentative layout and structure to build their own portfolio.
  4. Seesaw: Seesaw is a powerful tool to help students create and share digital portfolios. It allows them to capture and showcase their learning in multiple formats. They can include videos, drawings, text notes, links, and several other materials to their portfolios. Teachers and parents can easily access and check students work.
  5. Evernote: This is another practical option for creating digital portfolios. Students record their thoughts using notes then enhance these notes using things such as photos, audio files, links, and attachments. Evernote provides various organizational features that enable users to effectively organize their work so it can be easily searched and accessed across different devices.

Sources:

Source taken from: https://www.educatorstechnology.com/2018/01/benefits-of-using-portfolios-in.html

Why Educator Have to Blog?

Educators are quick to tell students about the benefits of blogging, but slow to embrace them personally. Part of this is simply the immense work load educators take on these days but part of it is also the rut in which many educators find themselves in regards to approaching their work – and their students. Many educators understand that blogging can help nurture relationships with fellow education professionals and reach out to students academically but too many think the benefits stop there.
 
Blogging – Why It Matters to Educators?
Educators have always come together to exchange ideas, learn about new approaches in education and, of course, to simply vent their frustrations.  While this has traditionally been done through user groups, informal social networks and both online and print journals, blogging has added a new element as well as new responsibilities. 
First, blogging forces educators to return to their roots by organizing their thoughts in order to write and post their opinions, observations and findings.  Returning to the basics this way helps professionals organize their thoughts more effectively and puts them in a better position to help students who struggle with some of the same issues.  An educator who blogs regularly can help students more effectively when it comes to organizing their essay structure, finding reliable resources and simply making the time to sit down and write. 
Blogging has become the best and most effective way to share and discuss new approaches in education and how to meet the challenges of the 21st Century classroom.  For some students that means finding the ways to draw their attention back to education (and away from Angry Birds) while for others it means finding ways to integrate personal electronics, social media and memes into their curriculum.
Reaching Out to Students 
Students today are much more relaxed, confident and at home when sitting behind a keyboard.  The same student who never says a word in class can prove to be the voice of a generation once they get home and are settled in behind their laptop, keyboard or tablet.  Involving students in blogging not only encourages them to open up and respond to posts, it also gives them more insight into your own methods and the  world of education in general.  
Students who have a clearer idea of why teachers do the things they do are more likely 
to have mature and motivated attitude to the education. They get the opportunity to see the things from an entirely different perspective and helps them to understand why education is important for their skills development and future opportunities. Teachers thus turn from ‘enemies’ and ‘punishers’ into mature friends, advisors, people who have experience and can be referred to with questions. 
Finally, it reinforces the idea that education isn’t just a phase in someone’s life – it’s a lifelong journey. Once they see that educators and professionals from every industry turn to blogging in order to connect with each other and encourage innovation, they’ll see the skills you’re trying so hard to teach them really do have a place outside your classroom.
Best Practices of Education Blogging
Of course, finding the right blog is all about knowing your audience and so teachers wrangling little kids will have different needs from those trying to help university students.  But no matter where you fall on the academic spectrum, there’s a blog for you. 
With cute colors and bubbly graphics, it’s clear the Chalk Talk team is dedicated to their smaller students. But don’t let their cutie-pie approach throw you off – these teachers are serious about education and the content drives that home. Recent posts have focused on heavy topics like phonological awareness and how to encourage writing skills in preschool children.  
Essay Universe 
a site on academic writing created by college university instructor Tracy Collins. The author aims to provide students with tips, hints and guides to help them hone their writing skills and fall in love with writing process. She researches different methods of teaching writing and plans to share them with her colleagues and students in interactive way. 
Elementary age students need the right foundation in order to excel as they get older and blogs such as 4 the Love of Teaching combine observation with research to tell other educators about new classroom techniques, age appropriate books and even products and tricks teachers can use to stretch their supplies and budget without going broke … or insane.
As kids approach middle school the challenges can increase with attention grabbing devices adding to the traditional mix of after-school activities and surging hormones making it difficult for kids to focus in class.  The 2 Peas and a Dog blog focuses on this crucial age to help educators find ways to cut through the noise and distractions and reach students.  It also offers a pretty comprehensive listing of related blogs for students from kindergarten through high school.
 Blogger Krystal Mills offers up plenty of help when it comes to technology and education.  While her focus is on middle school students, the issues she raises can easily translate to lower high school students, particularly freshman who often feel as though they have one foot in middle school and the other in high school.
If ever there was an academic phase that embraces insanity, it’s high school.  he students are more diverse and so are is the pressure on teachers.  Education is a central topic on this blog but the focus is also on arming students with skills they’ll need throughout their academic career and checking out new technologies that can help students and educators alike.
Run as a part of the Inside Higher Ed website, the University of Venus encompasses a wealth of ideas and theories when it comes to education.  It’s the perfect blog for teachers who want to expand their own techniques and find ways to deal with the politics of education within their curriculum.  It offers practical advice such as dealing with student assessments as well as serious issues that affect educators directly such as the recent adjunct crisis.
 The Thinking Stick offers a bit of everything and appeals to educators at every level.  If you’re teaching little kids, posts on clever ways to use Google Maps in the classroom can turn a simple geography lesson into something more engaging.  Teachers educating older students will find plenty of help with reading strategies in the digital age.  
Writer Lisa Nielsen covers everything from how to incorporate social media in the classroom to how best to set up a classroom in order to help students pay attention and learn more effectively.  Her approach is simple and clear-cut making her blog easy to read, search and put into practice. 
Following the best practice of educational blogging will help any teacher built stronger relations with their students and fellow educators and make valuable input into education development. Who knows – maybe soon we won’t use any textbooks and blogging will be the only source of relevant information.
Author’s Bio
Tracy Collins is a college writing instructor, the author of site on education and academic essay writing EssayUniverse.org
Source taken from: https://www.educatorstechnology.com/2015/04/why-educators-have-to-blog.html

Fundamental Digital Skills for 21st Century Teachers

 

Education is getting more and more digitized pushing us, teachers and educators, to re-conceptualize what it really means to be a teacher in the 21st century. Whether you are a technological determinist or a digital instrumentalist, technology has become an essential force shaping much of our teaching and pedagogy. It has also placed a number of demands and exigencies on us and to meet these exigencies we need to develop a set of key digital skills

Fundamental Digital

Digital Skills Tools
Record and edit audio clips ·                Soundcloud

·                Audioboo

·                Vocaroo

·                Clyp

Create annotated, interactive and engaging  video content ·                Blubbr

·                YouTube video editor

·                Blubbr

·                Teachem

·                VideoNotes

·                TED Ed

·                Edpuzzle

·                Wevideo

·                Magisto

Create visually engaging content ·                Piktochart

·                Canva

·                Google Draw

·                Glogster

·                Thinglink

Use social networking websites to create PLNs,  connect , discover new content, and grow professionally ·                Twitter

·                Facebook

·                Google Plus

·                LinkedIn

Use blogs and wikis to create participatory spaces for students ·                Blogger

·                WordPress

·                Edublog

·                Kidblog

·                Wikispaces

·                Weebly

Use Social bookmarking websites curate and  share resources with your class ·                Diigo

·                Scoop.it

·                Pinterest

·                Edshelf

·                Educlipper

·                Symbaloo

Create Engaging presentations ·                Google Slides

·                Haiku Deck

·                Prezi

·                Zoho Presentation

Create digital portfolios ·                SeeSaw

·                Pathbrite

·                Google Sites

·                Silk

·                Weebly

Create non-traditional quizzes ·                Testmoz

·                Quizalize

·                FlipQuiz

·                Riddle

·                QuizBean