Tag Archives: Educational technology

Using Social Media for Teaching and Learning

Social media tools can complement effective teaching strategies that encourage students to practice reflexive, communicative, critical thinking and problem solving skills in collaborative environments. Other drivers for the uptake of social media tools in teaching and learning include:

Student engagement and experience: Student engagement is linked with high-quality learning outcomes while interactions—with teachers, peers and content— is identified as an important aspect of engagement and the overall student experience.

Active learning: There is a wide body of research on the effectiveness of active learning to increase learner engagement through a range of learning activities designed to promote higher order thinking such as peer instruction, case-based learning and problem solving activities.

Access to information & technology: Several UQ surveys indicate that the majority of students own some sort of smart device with access to a vast array of useful information to research, curate, assimilate and share.

Student-centred and social learning: Contemporary theories of learning suggest that learning is more meaningful when designed from the point of view of the learner who is able to construct, contribute and resynthesise knowledge with a cohort of learners.

Digital literacy and citizenship: Embedding social media tools in teaching and learning also provides opportunities to promote good practices in using technology to support research skills, information and digital literacy as well as protocols and cultural mores for digital citizenship.

Source: http://www.uq.edu.au/teach/social-media-tools/about.html

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20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers

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20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers contributed by Miriam Clifford (source taken from https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/20-collaborative-learning-tips-and-strategies/)

There is an age-old adage that says “two heads are better than one.”

Consider collaboration in recent history: Watson and Crick or Page and Brin (Founders of Google). But did you know it was a collaborative Computer Club about basic programming at a middle school that brought together two minds that would change the future of computing?

Yes, those two were, of course, Bill Gates and Paul Allen, the founders of Microsoft. Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually.  Why is this so?

Groups tend to learn through “discussion, clarification of ideas, and evaluation of other’s ideas.” Perhaps information that is discussed is retained in long-term memory.  Research by Webb suggests that students who worked collaboratively on math computational problems earned significantly higher scores than those who worked alone.  Plus, students who demonstrated lower levels of achievement improved when working in diverse groups.

Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually. Many consider Vygotsky the father of ‘social learning.’  Vygotsky was an education rebel in many ways.  Vygotsky controversially argued for educators to assess students’ ability to solve problems, rather than knowledge acquisition. The idea of collaborative learning has a lot to do with Vygotsky’s idea of the “zone of proximal development”.  It considers what a student can do if aided by peers and adults. By considering this model for learning, we might consider collaboration to increase students’ awareness of other concepts. What are some ways to include best practices for collaborative learning in our classroom?

1. Establish clear group goals

Effective collaborative learning involves the establishment of group goals, as well as individual accountability. This keeps the group on task and establishes an unambiguous purpose. Before beginning an assignment, it is best to define goals and objectives to save time.

2. Keep groups midsized

Small groups of 3 or less lack enough diversity and may not allow divergent thinking to occur. Groups that are too large create ‘freeloading’ where not all members participate. A moderate size group of 4-5 is ideal.

3. Establish flexible group norms

Research suggests that collaborative learning is influenced by the quality of interactions.  Interactivity and negotiation are important in group learning. In the 1960’s studies by Jacobs and Campbell suggested that norms are pervasive, even deviant norms were handed down and not questioned.

If you notice a deviant norm, you can do two things:  rotate group members or assist in using outside information to develop a new norm.  You may want to establish rules for group interactions for younger students. Older students might create their own norms. But remember, given their durable nature, it is best to have flexible norms.  Norms should change with situations so that groups do not become rigid and intolerant or develop sub-groups.

4. Build trust and promote open communication

Successful interpersonal communication must exist in teams. Building trust is essential. Deal with emotional issues that arise immediately and any interpersonal problems before moving on. Assignments should encourage team members to explain concepts thoroughly to each other. Studies found that students who provide and receive intricate explanations gain most from collaborative learning. Open communication is key.

5. For larger tasks, create group roles

Decomposing a difficult task into parts to saves time. You can then assign different roles. A great example in my own classroom was in science lab, fifth grade student assumed different roles of group leader, recorder, reporter, and fact checker.  The students might have turns to choose their own role and alternate roles by sections of the assignment or classes.

6. Create a pre-test and post-test

A good way to ensure the group learns together would be to engage in a pre and post-test. In fact, many researchers use this method to see if groups are learning. An assessment gives the team a goal to work towards and ensures learning is a priority. It also allows instructors to gauge the effectiveness of the group. Changes can be made if differences are seen in the assessments over time. Plus, you can use Bloom’s taxonomy to further hone in on specific skills.

Individuals should also complete surveys evaluating how well the group functioned. “Debriefing” is an important component of the learning process and allows individuals to reflect on the process of group learning.

7. Consider the learning process itself as part of an assessment

Many studies such as those by Robert Slavin at Johns Hopkins have considered how cooperative learning helps children develop social and interpersonal skills. Experts have argued that the social and psychological effect on self-esteem and personal development are just as important as the learning itself.

In terms of assessment, it may be beneficial to grade students on the quality of discussion, student engagement, and adherence to group norms. Praise younger groups for following (for digital collaborative learning, for example) standards. This type of learning is a process and needs explicit instruction in beginning stages. Assessing the process itself provides motivation for students to learn how to behave in groups. It shows students that you value meaningful group interactions and adhering to norms.

8. Consider using different strategies, like the Jigsaw technique.

The jigsaw strategy is said to improve social interactions in learning and support diversity. The workplace is often like a jigsaw. It involves separating an assignment into subtasks, where individuals research their assigned area.  Students with the same topic from different groups might meet together to discuss ideas between groups. This type of collaboration allows students to become “experts” in their assigned topic. Students then return to their primary group to educate others.  There are other strategies discussed here by the University of Iowa, such as using clusters, buzz groups, round robin, leaning cells, or fish bowl discussions.

9. Allow groups to reduce anxiety

When tackling difficult concepts, group learning may provide a source of support.  Groups often use humor and create a more relaxed learning atmosphere that allows for positive learning experiences.  Allow groups to use some stress-reducing strategies as long as they stay on task.

10. Establish group interactions

The quality of discussions is a predictor of the achievement of the group.  Instructors should provide a model of how a successful group functions.  Shared leadership is best.  Students should work together on the task and maintenance functions of a group. Roles are important in group development. Task functions include:

  • Initiating Discussions
  • Clarifying points
  • Summarizing
  • Challenging assumptions/devil’s advocate
  • Providing or researching information
  • Reaching a consensus

Maintenance involves the harmony and emotional well-being of a group. Maintenance includes roles such as sensing group feelings, harmonizing, compromising and encouraging, time-keeping, relieving tension, bringing people into the discussion, and more.

11. Use real-world problems

Experts suggest that project-based learning using open-ended questions can be very engaging.  Rather than spending a lot of time designing an artificial scenario, use inspiration from everyday problems. Real world problems can be used to facilitate project-based learning and often have the right scope for collaborative learning.

12. Focus on enhancing problem-solving and critical thinking skills

Design assignments that allow room for varied interpretations. Different types of problems might focus on categorizing, planning, taking multiple perspectives, or forming solutions. Try to use a step-by-step procedure for problem-solving. Mark Alexander explains one generally accepted problem-solving procedure:

  • Identify the objective
  • Set criteria or goals
  • Gather data
  • Generate options or courses of action
  • Evaluate the options using data and objectives
  • Reach a decision
  • Implement the decision

13. Keep in mind the diversity of groups

Mixed groups that include a range of talents, backgrounds, learning styles, ideas, and experiences are best. Studies have found that mixed aptitude groups tend to learn more from each other and increase achievement of low performers. Rotate groups so students have a chance to learn from others.

14. Consider demographics

Equally, balanced gender groups were found to be most effective.

Some research suggests that boys were more likely to receive and give elaborate explanations and their stances were more easily accepted by the group.  In majority male groups girls were ignored.  In majority girl groups, girls tended to direct questions to the boy who often ignored them.  You may also want to specifically discuss or establish gender equality as a norm.  This may seem obvious, but it is often missed.  It may be an issue you may want to discuss with older students.

15. Use scaffolding or diminished responsibility as students begin to understand concepts.

At the beginning of a project, you may want to give more direction than the end.  Serve as a facilitator, such as by gauging group interactions or at first, providing a list of questions to consider. Allow groups to grow in responsibility as times goes on.  In your classroom, this may mean allowing teams to develop their own topics or products as time goes on.  After all, increased responsibility for learning is a goal in collaborative learning.

16. Include different types of learning scenarios

Studies suggest that collaborative learning that focuses on rich contexts and challenging questions produces higher-order reasoning.  Assignments can include laboratory work, study teams, debates, writing projects, problem-solving, and collaborative writing.

17. Technology makes collaborative learning easier

Collaboration had the same results via technology as in person, increased learning opportunities. Try incorporating free savvy tools for online collaboration such as Stixy, an online shared whiteboard space, Google groups, or Mikogo for online meetings. Be aware that some research suggests that more exchanges related to planning rather than challenging viewpoints occurred more frequently through online interactions.

This may be because the research used students that did not know one another. If this is your scenario, you may want to start by having students get to know each other’s backgrounds and ideas beforehand on a blog or chat-board.

18. Avoid ‘bad group work’

As with any learning strategy, it’s important to have a balanced approach.  Cynics usually have a valid point. A recent New York time article cites some criticism of collaboration for not allowing enough time for individual, creative thinking. You may allow some individual time to write notes before the groups begin.  This may be a great way to assess an individual grade.

19. Be wary of “group think”

While collaborative learning is a great tool, it is always important to consider a balanced approach. At times, group harmony can override the necessity for more critical perspectives. Some new research suggests that groups favored the more confident members. Changing up groups can help counter this problem.

20. Value diversity

Collaborative learning relies on some buy-in.  Students need to respect and appreciate each other’s viewpoints for it to work. For instance, class discussions can emphasize the need for different perspectives.  Create a classroom environment that encourages independent thinking.  Teach students the value of multiplicity in thought.  You may want to give historical or social examples where people working together were able to reach complex solutions.

By definition, learning is social in nature.  Using different mediums, whether it be books, discussions, technology or projects we study and develop new ideas. We impart ideas and share perspectives with others.  Collaboration is a learned process. If managed correctly, it is a powerful tool that can allow educators to tap into new ideas and information.

Benefit of Using Portfolios in Education: Tools and Resources for Teachers and Students

Digital portfolios are great teaching, learning, and assessment tools. In today’s post we are focusing on the learning part and are looking at e-portfolios from a student-centric perspective. To learn how teachers can leverage the powerful of portfolios in their instruction, check out Arter and Spandel (1992) paper (see reference list at the bottom of this page). By definition, a portfolio, according to Arter and Spandel, ‘is a purposeful collection of student work that exhibits to the student, or others, her efforts or achievement in one or more areas’ (cited in  Baki and Birgin, 2007, p. 77). The key word here is ‘purposeful’, a portfolio is different from a folder in that it has a purpose and is guided by a number of learning objectives and expected outcomes. Without intentional planning, a portfolio becomes a mere receptacle of one’s work.

 

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Three processes are involved in portfolio creation: collection, selection, and reflection. Each of these processes trains students in a number of skills. Together they provide students with the appropriate mindset to help them take responsibility of their learning and thrive as budding life-long learners.

There are numerous benefits students will gain from incorporating portfolios in their learning. Here is a summarized list of some these benefits based on readings we did in this regard (see sources list at the bottom of this post).
Portfolios enable students to record their learning and document their growth over a period of time.

  • They Provide students with a venue through which they can showcase their learning.
    They can be used as a tool for self-assessment, self-reflection and personal development.
  • They help students focus on the process of learning rather than the end product.
  • They promote deeper learning as students actively engage in the learning process.
  • They develop students metacognitive skills (reflective practices) and help them take control of their learning.
  • They empower students’ voice.
  • They are a ‘methodof self-discovery and confidence building’.
  • They help students develop personal and academic identities.
  • They assist students in locating their strengths and weaknesses and plan for future improvement.
  • They invite teachers’ feedback and peers’s input.
  • They help students develop their writing skills.
  • A portfolio presents a concrete evidence of your work and achievements to prospective employers.
  • There are several web tools students can use to create digital portfolios. We have already reviewed a number of them over the last few years. But if you are to ask us about the ones we recommend the most, we would direct you to the following:

We have created an infographic version of this post. Check out here.

  1. Google Sites: This is one of the best platforms we have been recommending for teachers over the last few years. Students can use it to create and host their own digital portfolios. The site is simple and easy to use and they can set up their new website within minutes. They can create as many pages as they want, then upload their content, and share with others. Site Help has everything students need to effectively use Google Sites.
  2. Weebly: This is another good website  students can use to create digital portfolios. Like Google Sites, Weebly provides users with a simple drag and drop editor that allows you to design your website the way you want. No HTML or coding knowledge acquired. You simply select a template, customize it with your own content and publish it to the web.
  3. Google Slides: Google Slides can be used to create digital portolios in the form of a presentation. There is actually a pre-made template for that. This Portfolio template provides students with a tentative layout and structure to build their own portfolio.
  4. Seesaw: Seesaw is a powerful tool to help students create and share digital portfolios. It allows them to capture and showcase their learning in multiple formats. They can include videos, drawings, text notes, links, and several other materials to their portfolios. Teachers and parents can easily access and check students work.
  5. Evernote: This is another practical option for creating digital portfolios. Students record their thoughts using notes then enhance these notes using things such as photos, audio files, links, and attachments. Evernote provides various organizational features that enable users to effectively organize their work so it can be easily searched and accessed across different devices.

Sources:

Source taken from: https://www.educatorstechnology.com/2018/01/benefits-of-using-portfolios-in.html

Why Educator Have to Blog?

Educators are quick to tell students about the benefits of blogging, but slow to embrace them personally. Part of this is simply the immense work load educators take on these days but part of it is also the rut in which many educators find themselves in regards to approaching their work – and their students. Many educators understand that blogging can help nurture relationships with fellow education professionals and reach out to students academically but too many think the benefits stop there.
 
Blogging – Why It Matters to Educators?
Educators have always come together to exchange ideas, learn about new approaches in education and, of course, to simply vent their frustrations.  While this has traditionally been done through user groups, informal social networks and both online and print journals, blogging has added a new element as well as new responsibilities. 
First, blogging forces educators to return to their roots by organizing their thoughts in order to write and post their opinions, observations and findings.  Returning to the basics this way helps professionals organize their thoughts more effectively and puts them in a better position to help students who struggle with some of the same issues.  An educator who blogs regularly can help students more effectively when it comes to organizing their essay structure, finding reliable resources and simply making the time to sit down and write. 
Blogging has become the best and most effective way to share and discuss new approaches in education and how to meet the challenges of the 21st Century classroom.  For some students that means finding the ways to draw their attention back to education (and away from Angry Birds) while for others it means finding ways to integrate personal electronics, social media and memes into their curriculum.
Reaching Out to Students 
Students today are much more relaxed, confident and at home when sitting behind a keyboard.  The same student who never says a word in class can prove to be the voice of a generation once they get home and are settled in behind their laptop, keyboard or tablet.  Involving students in blogging not only encourages them to open up and respond to posts, it also gives them more insight into your own methods and the  world of education in general.  
Students who have a clearer idea of why teachers do the things they do are more likely 
to have mature and motivated attitude to the education. They get the opportunity to see the things from an entirely different perspective and helps them to understand why education is important for their skills development and future opportunities. Teachers thus turn from ‘enemies’ and ‘punishers’ into mature friends, advisors, people who have experience and can be referred to with questions. 
Finally, it reinforces the idea that education isn’t just a phase in someone’s life – it’s a lifelong journey. Once they see that educators and professionals from every industry turn to blogging in order to connect with each other and encourage innovation, they’ll see the skills you’re trying so hard to teach them really do have a place outside your classroom.
Best Practices of Education Blogging
Of course, finding the right blog is all about knowing your audience and so teachers wrangling little kids will have different needs from those trying to help university students.  But no matter where you fall on the academic spectrum, there’s a blog for you. 
With cute colors and bubbly graphics, it’s clear the Chalk Talk team is dedicated to their smaller students. But don’t let their cutie-pie approach throw you off – these teachers are serious about education and the content drives that home. Recent posts have focused on heavy topics like phonological awareness and how to encourage writing skills in preschool children.  
Essay Universe 
a site on academic writing created by college university instructor Tracy Collins. The author aims to provide students with tips, hints and guides to help them hone their writing skills and fall in love with writing process. She researches different methods of teaching writing and plans to share them with her colleagues and students in interactive way. 
Elementary age students need the right foundation in order to excel as they get older and blogs such as 4 the Love of Teaching combine observation with research to tell other educators about new classroom techniques, age appropriate books and even products and tricks teachers can use to stretch their supplies and budget without going broke … or insane.
As kids approach middle school the challenges can increase with attention grabbing devices adding to the traditional mix of after-school activities and surging hormones making it difficult for kids to focus in class.  The 2 Peas and a Dog blog focuses on this crucial age to help educators find ways to cut through the noise and distractions and reach students.  It also offers a pretty comprehensive listing of related blogs for students from kindergarten through high school.
 Blogger Krystal Mills offers up plenty of help when it comes to technology and education.  While her focus is on middle school students, the issues she raises can easily translate to lower high school students, particularly freshman who often feel as though they have one foot in middle school and the other in high school.
If ever there was an academic phase that embraces insanity, it’s high school.  he students are more diverse and so are is the pressure on teachers.  Education is a central topic on this blog but the focus is also on arming students with skills they’ll need throughout their academic career and checking out new technologies that can help students and educators alike.
Run as a part of the Inside Higher Ed website, the University of Venus encompasses a wealth of ideas and theories when it comes to education.  It’s the perfect blog for teachers who want to expand their own techniques and find ways to deal with the politics of education within their curriculum.  It offers practical advice such as dealing with student assessments as well as serious issues that affect educators directly such as the recent adjunct crisis.
 The Thinking Stick offers a bit of everything and appeals to educators at every level.  If you’re teaching little kids, posts on clever ways to use Google Maps in the classroom can turn a simple geography lesson into something more engaging.  Teachers educating older students will find plenty of help with reading strategies in the digital age.  
Writer Lisa Nielsen covers everything from how to incorporate social media in the classroom to how best to set up a classroom in order to help students pay attention and learn more effectively.  Her approach is simple and clear-cut making her blog easy to read, search and put into practice. 
Following the best practice of educational blogging will help any teacher built stronger relations with their students and fellow educators and make valuable input into education development. Who knows – maybe soon we won’t use any textbooks and blogging will be the only source of relevant information.
Author’s Bio
Tracy Collins is a college writing instructor, the author of site on education and academic essay writing EssayUniverse.org
Source taken from: https://www.educatorstechnology.com/2015/04/why-educators-have-to-blog.html

Fundamental Digital Skills for 21st Century Teachers

 

Education is getting more and more digitized pushing us, teachers and educators, to re-conceptualize what it really means to be a teacher in the 21st century. Whether you are a technological determinist or a digital instrumentalist, technology has become an essential force shaping much of our teaching and pedagogy. It has also placed a number of demands and exigencies on us and to meet these exigencies we need to develop a set of key digital skills

Fundamental Digital

Digital Skills Tools
Record and edit audio clips ·                Soundcloud

·                Audioboo

·                Vocaroo

·                Clyp

Create annotated, interactive and engaging  video content ·                Blubbr

·                YouTube video editor

·                Blubbr

·                Teachem

·                VideoNotes

·                TED Ed

·                Edpuzzle

·                Wevideo

·                Magisto

Create visually engaging content ·                Piktochart

·                Canva

·                Google Draw

·                Glogster

·                Thinglink

Use social networking websites to create PLNs,  connect , discover new content, and grow professionally ·                Twitter

·                Facebook

·                Google Plus

·                LinkedIn

Use blogs and wikis to create participatory spaces for students ·                Blogger

·                WordPress

·                Edublog

·                Kidblog

·                Wikispaces

·                Weebly

Use Social bookmarking websites curate and  share resources with your class ·                Diigo

·                Scoop.it

·                Pinterest

·                Edshelf

·                Educlipper

·                Symbaloo

Create Engaging presentations ·                Google Slides

·                Haiku Deck

·                Prezi

·                Zoho Presentation

Create digital portfolios ·                SeeSaw

·                Pathbrite

·                Google Sites

·                Silk

·                Weebly

Create non-traditional quizzes ·                Testmoz

·                Quizalize

·                FlipQuiz

·                Riddle

·                QuizBean

Five technology in education trends for 2018

education-trends-2018

It’s the final month of the calendar year but the world of education is already comprehensively planning for 2018. As SMT objectives evolve and technology advances, new teaching methods and edtech trends emerge each year. Technology in education constantly disrupts and enhances pedagogy. It paves the way for new learning experiences and provides innovative ways to achieve core goals for the next academic year.

Here’s the trends in technology and education to look out for in 2018:

1. Cloud-based technology

In 2018, cloud computing will continue to make learning a more streamlined experience for pupils. Students will no longer worry about files and documents being lost or deleted, or buying multiple USB flash drives to save their assignments. Essays, content related to projects, schedules and assignments will be shared more easily and securely stored on the cloud, such as Google Docs. With more centralised storage for resources, cloud-based technology will allow educators to increase their reach and share information without increased expenditure, or additional time pressure.

2. Virtual and augmented reality

SMT will provide teachers with tools for delivering enhanced learning experiences through augmented and virtual reality in 2018. After the success of Pokemon Go, we witnessed the emergence of augmented reality in educationin 2017. Teachers are increasingly using AR to layer virtual content on printed materials to enhance understanding and inspiration. The_State_of_Technology_in_Education_ReportWith the release of increasingly affordable and accessible VR accessories, we can expect more from this technology in 2018. The number of free apps and teaching platforms designed specifically for virtual education is growing. VR and AR will move from experimental to ubiquitous in learning. Work with your IT team to review the available devices, and make sure you investigate the costs of emulating a real work environment effectively.

3. STEAM — arts and STEM

There has been a strong pedagogical focus to increase the digital literacy of pupils, and encourage more students to adopt tech-focused subjects over the past few years. This has ensured children grow into more responsible netizens, as well as fostering key transferable skills for their futures.

According to our research on the use of technology in education in 2017, STEM classes are perceived as the most technologically-advanced of the curriculum. More traditional arts and humanities subjects, however, are recognised as catching up in their use of edtech.

Trends in technology, and the increased use of edtech across the entire curriculum, indicates that creativity will return to the forefront of education. Incorporating elements of creativity into STEM subjects has undeniable benefits including increasing the accessibility across genders, and engaging different types of learners. The STEAM approach will take more shape in 2018.

4. Technology to prevent bullying

With the prolific nature of mobile devices and social platforms, it’s a sad truth that online bullying is becoming increasingly common. While technology is an enabler for abusive behaviour, it will go on to provide more robust solutions to the problem in 2018.

Edtech will be used extensively in 2018 to monitor pupils’ technology, track the use of search terms that they use, as well as all visited websites. More apps will allow teachers and SMTs to remotely view any of their students’ devices. Other technologies will be applied directly to pupils’ devices to monitor tone of voice, location services, image scanning, keyword flagging and social media activity, to give an overall picture of a child’s mood.

Platforms to provide a means of reporting and communication between teachers and pupils will grow in popularity. These tools raise awareness of the widespread bullying issue, and enhance methods of communication.

5. Mobile-style education

Today, many pupils own a mobile device. Tapping this technology for learning in 2018 will improve engagement and motivation across all learning abilities. Mobile learning will also offer greater flexibility and accessibility for learning at home. Connecting mobile technology and devices within the classroom will allow teachers to provide a fully immersive, integrated learning experience for all learning styles and abilities.

Thank to pupils’ intuitive use of technology, in 2018 more schools will adopt tablet-like experiences for their front of class displays and incorporate this with camouflaged learning techniques and the gamification of learning. Traditional interactive whiteboards are becoming harder to scale or costly to replace, whereas SMTs are turning to more future-proof, upgradeable technologies like Promethean ActivPanels.

Innovations and trends in technology across businesses and enterprise are giving SMTs more advanced tools and better forms of edtech to improve their school’s results and enhance their teachers’ pedagogy. Innovative teachers, meanwhile, are getting more creative with their edtech, finding ways to use technology for differentiated learning and increased engagement.

The biggest potential impact on pupils of technology in education in 2018 will be the opportunity to nurture skills to help them succeed, increase the quality of learning across mixed-ability classes, and protect students’ online safety.

 

Source taken from: https://resourced.prometheanworld.com/edtech-trends-2018/

FULL REPORT: The_State_of_Technology_in_Education_Report

The 8 Digital Skills Students Need for The Future ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

In a recent research article published by PEW Internet under the title ” The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is Taught in Schools “, 91% of teachers surveyed report that ” judging the quality of information ” as the top of the digital skills students need for the future. Similarly, another 91 report that “writing effectively” as being essential skill for students while 54 % of teachers think that working with audio, video or graphic content as being important but not essential.GjEmzgcBl-fnJq-X-vnHQTl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVvK0kTmF0xjctABnaLJIm9.jpg