Tenth Month Baby

 

Tenth Month Baby

 

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Ninth Month Baby

 

Ninth Month Baby

Your baby’s menu should be quite broad by now. He should be adept at eating various foods, and she may have three or four teeth to aid her as he eats. If so, you can probably progress to foods that are labeled “second stage”. These will have more texture and include soft lumps. Most babies handle table foods well (mash them up with a fork) but go slowly when adding new foods. If there is a family history of allergies then it’s best to delay highly allergenic foods like eggs or wheat products. Solid foods aren’t so important at this age. Your baby’s primary food should still be breast milk or formula.

If your baby is going to crawl, he may be doing it by this time or in the next month or so. You may discover that your baby loves to cruise around the furniture. Once she is able to sit herself up, the next step will be to maneuver himself over to a piece of furniture, pull-up, and eventually walk beside the furniture. When he gets a little braver, she’ll let go and tentatively take a few hesitant steps before dropping to the floor.

She’ll still enjoy being read and sung to, and she’ll also enjoy toys that she can stack or push and pull. She will be curious about how things work, so give her plenty of age appropriate toys to encourage this curiosity. Many babies at this age become fascinated with any toy which makes a noise.

 

Eighth Month Baby

Eighth Month Baby

By now your baby may have mastered the art of movement. In fact, you may place him on the floor, turn your back for a moment, and discover that he has moved several feet away. He may not be crawling yet, but that won’t stop him from reaching his desired destination!

Some babies move by scooting on their bottoms, pushing themselves backwards on their tummies, rolling, or rising to their hands and knees and then flopping forwards. These may be preliminary crawling movements, but some babies never actually crawl at all. They simply progress from creeping to pulling up and walking. The age of a baby and the type movement he uses will vary greatly for each individual child.

By the time your baby is eight months of age, she should be able to sit well with assistance, and she may even be able to sit up on her own by this time. Don’t be surprised to find her sitting up in her crib one day when you walk into her room. She’ll probably greet your with a big smile, too!

Seventh Month Baby

 

Seventh Month Baby

Stranger anxiety emerges when your baby’s memory has taken a leap forward. Up to now, babies have pretty good “recognition memory.” That is, they could recognize things and faces and environments with which they were already familiar. Witness that huge, warm smile they save for when you magically reappear. But, what emerges around now is “retrieval memory” which is the ability to bring back to mind something that is not currently present. It is linked with a better sense of object permanence, when babies can find objects that are completely hidden. So, out of sight is no longer out of mind.

Resource from : http://www.webmd.com

Sixth Month Baby

You may find it hard to believe, but you’ve made it halfway through your infant’s first year! In just six short months, your baby has started to learn how to communicate, eat solid foods, sit up without help, and get around independently.

Sixth Month Baby

Sixth-Month Baby Milestones: Growth | During the first few months of life, your baby was growing at a rate of about 1 ½ to 2 pounds a month. By now, she should have at least doubled her birth weight. At six months, your baby’s growth will slow to about 1 pound a month. Your baby’s height gain will also slow, to about a half-inch each month.

Sixth-Month Baby Milestones: Motor Skills | Your baby should be starting to sit alone by six months. To get ready, babies first prop themselves up with their hands, but over time they can start to let go and sit unsupported.

Your 6-month-old can probably roll from her back to her stomach and vice versa. Some babies can propel themselves around the floor using this rolling method. Or, they may creep forward or backward — sliding around on their tummies while pushing against the floor. You may notice your baby rise up on hands and knees and rock back and forth. But even if she does, she might not be ready to crawl for another month or two.

Sixth-Month Baby Milestones: Sleep | Most babies are sleeping six to eight hours at a stretch by six months. When babies at this age have trouble falling or staying asleep, some parents turn to a method developed by pediatrician Richard Ferber. The Ferber Method, as it is known, involves putting your baby into the crib while she’s still awake. If your baby cries, you wait for a progressively longer period of time each night before going in to provide comfort. This method works well for some families, but you may need to experiment with several different sleep methods before you find the one that works best for you.

Now that your baby can roll over independently, don’t be alarmed if you put her to sleep on her back and she wakes up on her tummy. The risk of SIDS is much lower at six months than it was in the first few months of life. Still, it’s a good idea to keep stuffed animals, pillows, and other soft items out of the crib for now.

Sixth-Month Baby Milestones: The Senses | You may notice that your baby’s eyes have changed from their birth color. Lighter-colored eyes may go through several shifts before settling on their final shade at about six months. If your baby still has blue eyes now, chances are they’ll stay that way permanently.

Resource from : http://www.webmd.com

Fifth Month Baby

The fifth month is a time of transitions for your baby. You can expect him at this age to make his first attempts at real speech. She’s also gearing up to start crawling, which means you need to be ready for your little one’s new mobility.

Fifth Month Baby

Fifth-Month Baby Milestones: Motor Skills | Five-month-old babies can sit upright for longer periods of time. Your baby probably still needs to be propped up with a pillow or Boppy, but he may also be able to sit unsupported for a few seconds at a time.

Some 5-month-olds can start rolling over from their back to their tummy. Once your baby does roll over, you may notice him working her legs and rocking. She’s getting ready for crawling and scooting, which are just a couple of months away! But remember, when your baby is able to roll over, make sure you never leave him on a bed or other high surface where he can accidentally roll off and be injured.

Another thing you’ll notice at five months is that your baby’s grasp is getting stronger. She can pull objects closer and pick them up in the palm of his hand then move them adeptly from one hand to the other. Your baby may even be able to hold a bottle or sippy cup by herself.

Fifth-Month Baby Milestones: Sleep | Most babies sleep through the night by five months, but not all. To encourage your baby to get into a regular nighttime sleep rhythm, establish a bedtime routine. Start with a warm bath, followed by a few minutes of gentle rocking with a song and story, and your baby’s eyes are sure to start drooping.

Get into the habit of putting your baby into the crib drowsy, rather than fully asleep. This way, your baby will learn how to soothe himself to sleep rather than relying on you.

During the daytime, your baby will still need two naps — one in the morning and one after lunch. Try not to delay naps until your baby is already tired and cranky. Put your baby into the crib at the first signs of sleepiness. Nap time is a good time to plan your activities that your baby somehow keeps you from getting to.

Fifth-Month Baby Milestones: The Senses | Your 5-month-old’s vision is continuing to improve. At this point, babies still don’t have 20/20 vision, but they can see well at different distances and their eyes can focus together without crossing. At five months, your baby’s color perception has sharpened to the point where he can tell the difference between two shades of the same color. But babies at this age still prefer primary colors such as red, blue, and yellow.

Resource from : http://www.webmd.com

Fourth Month Baby

Your 4-month-old is growing more and more alert by the day. Babies at this age love to express themselves through smiles, laughs, gurgles, and coos.

 

Fourth Month Baby

Fourth-Month Baby Milestones: Growth | By month four, your baby’s weight will likely have doubled from birth. If you’re concerned that your child isn’t eating well or isn’t gaining enough weight, talk to your pediatrician.

Fourth-Month Baby Milestones: Motor Skills | Your baby is becoming more dexterous and doing more with her hands. Her hands now work together to move a toy or shake a rattle. In fact, those hands will grab for just about anything within reach, including a stuffed animal, your hair, and any colorful or shiny object hanging nearby. You might want to remove any earrings or necklaces if you don’t want to experience a painful tug.

Anything your baby is able to pick up will likely end up in her mouth — tasting is one of the ways she explores her world. It’s crucial that you don’t leave small items lying around that your baby could choke on. Anything that can fit inside a toilet paper tube is too small to be within finger’s reach of your 4-month-old. By now, your baby’s head should no longer be wobbly. Four-month-olds have pretty good head control while sitting supported, and they can hold their head and chest upright while lying on their stomach during tummy time. They also can kick and push with their feet. Some babies have even figured out how to roll from tummy to back at this point.

Fourth-Month Baby Milestones: Sleep | By your baby’s fourth month, you both should be enjoying a full night’s sleep. At this age babies typically can sleep seven to eight hours in a row. Add in two naps, and your baby should be sleeping a total of 14 to 16 hours a day.

Fourth-Month Baby Milestones: The Senses| During the first three months, babies have a lot of trouble distinguishing color contrasts, which was why your newborn preferred bright colors and black-and-white objects. Now at four months, your baby’s vision has sharpened to about 20/40. Babies at this age can pick out more subtle color contrasts, such as a red button on a red shirt. They also can see across the room, although they still prefer looking at people close-up.

Your baby’s eyes should move together smoothly and follow objects and people around the room. If you notice crossed eyes or any other vision problems, be sure to mention them to your pediatrician. You also may notice that your baby’s eyes are starting to change color. Lighter-colored eyes may go through several changes before settling on their final shade at about six months.

Resource from : http://www.webmd.com

 

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